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Bosnian court acquits ex-Srebrenica commander of war crimes

Bosnia’s war crimes court on Monday acquitted the wartime commander of Srebrenica, who was accused of committing atrocities against Serbs during the 1992-95 Balkan conflict. The acquittal of Naser Oric immediately prompted anger from Serbian leaders, with Serbian Defense Minister Aleksandar Vulin saying the court ruling “threatens security, trust and reconciliation in the whole of the Balkans.” Oric was accused of war crimes against three Serb prisoners of war who were slain in villages around the Bosnian town of Srebrenica in the early days of the conflict. A panel of judges presiding over the trial ruled Monday the prosecution did not present evidence proving the case against Oric.   Oric had previously been tried by a U.N. war crimes tribunal in The Hague, where he was also acquitted in 2008. Source: Legal News Post Bosnian court acquits ex-Srebrenica commander of war crimes

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A Crack of the Bat. A Blow to the Head. Who Pays the Bill? – Bloomberg

A Crack of the Bat. A Blow to the Head. Who Pays the Bill? – Bloomberg: aseball is timeless. Is the Baseball Rule?The century-old legal doctrine blocks fans from suing a ball club if they get hurt by a foul ball or a shattered bat. The reason: Fans accept the risk of injury at a ballgame because they know batters will occasionally rocket balls into the grandstands.Fresh off the New York Yankees’ playoff-game win against the Minnesota Twins, a New York appeals court on Wednesday considered a lawsuit that is testing whether the Baseball Rule — like the Twins’ 2017 season — is now obsolete. Source: TTLA E-Clips A Crack of the Bat. A Blow to the Head. Who Pays the Bill? – Bloomberg

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Son of Las Vegas Shooting Victim Asks Court to Freeze Gunman’s Assets – WSJ

Son of Las Vegas Shooting Victim Asks Court to Freeze Gunman’s Assets – WSJ: LAS VEGAS—The son of a Southern California man who died in the Las Vegas massacre last week is asking a Nevada court to freeze the assets of gunman Stephen Paddock so that he and other victims can pursue claims. Source: TTLA E-Clips Son of Las Vegas Shooting Victim Asks Court to Freeze Gunman’s Assets – WSJ

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Court nixes class-action status for TGI Friday's drink suit

A lawsuit accusing restaurant chain TGI Friday’s violated consumer fraud laws with its drink pricing can’t go ahead as a class action that could have included millions of members, but a similar case involving Carrabba’s Italian Grill restaurants can, New Jersey’s state Supreme Court ruled Wednesday. Debra Dugan sued TGI Friday’s after she was charged one price for a drink at the bar and a higher price at a table in 2008. The restaurant didn’t list drink prices on its menus, according to the lawsuit. A lower court in 2012 granted class-action status to anyone who ordered unpriced drinks at 14 of the company’s restaurants in New Jersey from 2004 through 2014. TGI Friday’s had estimated that could have amounted to as many as 14 million customers, according to court filings. But the plaintiffs disputed that figure. According to the lawsuit, TGI Friday’s conducted research that showed that customers spent an average of $1.72 less on drinks if the prices were displayed than if the prices weren’t displayed. The lawsuit sought to prove that that amount could be considered a loss for anyone who had ordered a drink at the restaurants. Wednesday’s 5-1 ruling rejected that argument, but said individual claims could still proceed. Source: Legal News Post Court nixes class-action status for TGI Friday's drink suit

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Indiana courts see changes with new e-filing system

Electronic filing is transforming the way Indiana’s judicial system works. Fifty-five of the state’s 92 counties have adopted mandatory electronic filing for most new criminal and civil lawsuits over the past 15 months, The (Northwest Indiana) Times reported. The state’s appellate division has also adopted the electronic system. The Supreme Court’s Office of Court Technology says more than 2.1 million documents have been electronically filed in the state since July 1, 2016. E-filing makes judges and lawyers more efficient and improves court services for Indiana residents, said Justice Steven David. Non-confidential court documents are also available online. E-filing has been adopted quickly through the state because may counties are using the same case management system called Odyssey, said Justice Mark Massa. The system is paid for by a $20 automated record keeping fee that’s attached to every case filed in Indiana court. “It’s the best deal for counties,” Massa said. “It carries with it state funding of that technology and that support, and we’re getting closer and closer to that complete statewide coverage with each passing year.” The system also allows the judicial branch to generate comprehensive data about crimes, courts, dispositions, children in need of services, protection orders and other information that the legislative and executive branches need when enacting new laws, David said. “In the old days, you might get data from one court and try to extrapolate, or determine if that court is representative of the rest of the state or not, and that’s no longer the case,” David said. Source: Legal News Post Indiana courts see changes with new e-filing system

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