888-505-1335

Se Habla Español

Brother of victim in unsolved Ohio massacre appears in court

The brother of one of eight victims of an unsolved southern Ohio massacre has appeared in court for a hearing on evidence-tampering and vandalism charges over allegations he destroyed a GPS tracking device. Forty-year-old James Manley, of Peebles, appeared in Pike County Court on the felony charges Wednesday. A judge set an $80,000 bond. Court records don’t indicate if Manley has an attorney. Investigators trying to solve the slayings placed the tracking device on Manley’s truck last month. Manley was jailed after turning himself in on Tuesday. Manley’s sister, Dana Rhoden, was among the eight members of the Rhoden family killed in April 2016. They were found shot at four homes near Piketon, about 70 miles (113 kilometers) south of Columbus. No arrests have been made in the slayings. Source: Legal News Post Brother of victim in unsolved Ohio massacre appears in court

Continue Reading

Court likely to question if Trump's travel ban discriminates

For the second time in a week, government lawyers will try to persuade a federal appeals court to reinstate President Donald Trump’s revised travel ban — and once again, they can expect plenty of questions Monday about whether it was designed to discriminate against Muslims. A three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has scheduled arguments in Seattle over Hawaii’s lawsuit challenging the travel ban, which would suspend the nation’s refugee program and temporarily bar new visas for citizens of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. Last week, judges on the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals heard arguments over whether to affirm a Maryland judge’s decision putting the ban on ice. They peppered Acting Solicitor General Jeffrey Wall with questions about whether they could consider Trump’s campaign statements calling for a ban on Muslims entering the U.S., with one judge asking if there was anything other than “willful blindness” that would prevent them from doing so. Monday’s arguments mark the second time Trump’s efforts to restrict immigration from certain Muslim-majority nations have reached the San Francisco-based 9th Circuit. After Trump issued his initial travel ban on a Friday in late January, bringing chaos and protests to airports around the country, a Seattle judge blocked its enforcement nationwide — a decision that was unanimously upheld by a three-judge 9th Circuit panel. Source: Legal News Post Court likely to question if Trump's travel ban discriminates

Continue Reading

South Dakota and Flandreau Santee Sioux tribe clash in court

The Flandreau Santee Sioux tribe is suing South Dakota over the state’s interpretation that contractors working on an expansion of the Royal River Casino are required to pay contractor excise taxes to the state. The Argus Leader reported that the lawsuit alleges it’s an intrusion into tribal sovereignty and is conflicting with U.S. laws that regulate commerce on reservations. “The economic burden and the intrusion into tribal sovereignty interfere and are incompatible with the federal and tribal interests in promoting tribal self-government, self-sufficiency and economic development,” the lawsuit said. The lawsuit is the latest clash between the tribe and the state. The tribe’s casino has often been a flashpoint for disputes. The Flandreau started expanding the casino after Gov. Dennis Daugaard agreed to allow the tribe to double the number of slots it had there. The tribe agreed to increase payments to Moody County to offset law enforcement expenses. Daugaard’s chief of staff, Tony Venhuizen, said the tribe doesn’t collect the contractors’ excise tax. Source: Legal News Post South Dakota and Flandreau Santee Sioux tribe clash in court

Continue Reading

Appeal in boy's burp arrest case relies on Gorsuch dissent

One of Neil Gorsuch’s sharpest dissents as an appeals court judge came just six months before he was nominated for the Supreme Court. That’s when he sided with a New Mexico seventh-grader who was handcuffed and arrested after his teacher said the student had disrupted gym class with fake burps. Nearly a year later, Gorsuch sits on the nation’s higher court and the boy’s mother is asking the justices to take up her appeal. She’s using Gorsuch’s words to argue that she has a right to sue the officer who arrested her son. The court could act as early as Monday, either to deny the case or take more time to decide. Justices typically withdraw from cases they heard before joining the Supreme Court, which means Gorsuch probably would not have any role in considering this one. But that hasn’t stopped lawyers for the mother from featuring his stinging dissent prominently in legal papers. Gorsuch said arresting a “class clown” for burping was going “a step too far.” “If a seventh-grader starts trading fake burps for laughs in gym class, what’s a teacher to do?” Gorsuch wrote. “Order extra laps? Detention? A trip to the principal’s office? Maybe. But then again, maybe that’s too old school. Maybe today you call a police officer. And maybe today the officer decides that, instead of just escorting the now compliant thirteen-year-old to the principal’s office, an arrest would be a better idea.” Whether the Supreme Court ultimately takes the case or not may have nothing to do with Gorsuch. The justices have repeatedly turned away disputes over school disciplinary policies. Or they may decide it’s not important enough for the court to intervene. The appeal comes as some school districts have been rolling back “zero tolerance” discipline policies that expanded in the 1990s. The shift is aimed at preventing students from getting caught up in the criminal justice system. Source: Legal News Post Appeal in boy's burp arrest case relies on Gorsuch dissent

Continue Reading

Judge rejects effort to block Confederate statue's removal

A last-ditch effort to block the removal of a monument to a Confederate general in New Orleans was rejected Wednesday by a Louisiana judge who turned away arguments that the city doesn’t own the statue or the land on which it sits. “This has gone on an inordinate amount of time,” Judge Kern Reese said as he outlined reasons for his refusal to grant an injunction protecting the statue of Gen. P.G.T Beauregard. It was a reference to state and federal court battles that delayed removal of the Beauregard monument and three others for more than a year. The huge bronze image of Beauregard on horseback sits in the center of a traffic circle at the entrance to New Orleans City Park. Those who don’t want it removed argued that it belongs to a park board and, therefore, the city has no authority to remove it. Reese’s rejection of an injunction means the city can remove the statue pending further proceedings in his court. Richard Marksbury, a New Orleans resident and monument supporter, said he may go to an appeal court to block removal. The Beauregard statue, a statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee and one of Confederate President Jefferson Davis are slated for removal. A fourth structure, the Liberty Place monument, was removed late last month. It honored whites who battled a biracial Reconstruction-era government in New Orleans. The Liberty Place monument was taken down without advance notice in the dead of night by workers in masks and body armor. City officials have been secretive about removal plans due to threats of violence against those tasked with taking down the structures. In Reese’s court, Franklin Jones, an attorney for Marksbury, cited documents asserting that the independent, state-supervised board that oversees City Park owns the Beauregard statue and the tract of land on which it sits. Adam Swensek, an assistant city attorney, noted court precedents holding otherwise and said delays in removing the monuments only prolong a controversy that has resulted in tense confrontations between pro- and anti-monument groups at monument sites. Source: Legal News Post Judge rejects effort to block Confederate statue's removal

Continue Reading